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Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

A Family Heritage

Belugas, particularly females, have high site fidelity – meaning they return to the same areas year after year.  This is common in many whale species; the young learn from their mothers the good hunting grounds and safe wintering areas and continue the “family tradition” of visiting the same places.  Belugas will return each year to the same estuaries where they were born, even when they are fully mature.  While they may not spend the entire year in family groups, individuals check in with relatives and continue their family associations each summer.  Not a bad way to spend a summer vacation!

In captivity, belugas are moved between oceanariums as the needs of the “captive stock” dictate – for breeding purposes, to replace one who has died, or to create a bigger attraction.  They do not choose when and where they travel, and they certainly do not get to visit with family each year.  They don’t even get to choose their social groups; their tankmates and assemblages are decided by those who keep them in captivity.

This week, we’re asking Ford Motor Company to maintain their heritage of family and community by protecting the beluga families of the Arctic.  Please join WDC in telling Ford’s Community & Environment department: “Ford Motors: you strive to be sustainable – don’t support Georgia Aquarium’s effort to import wild belugas.  Captivity is not sustainable!

Thank you for protecting beluga families! See you next week for another action alert and beluga fun fact!