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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

Call on Antigua and Barbuda to ban dolphin captivity!

Unlike many other countries in the Caribbean, the dual-island nation Antigua and Barbuda has no captive dolphins. This was not the case several years ago, when a captive dolphin facility operated at Marina Bay in Antigua. It opened in 2001, run by Dolphin Fantaseas, displaying three bottlenose dolphins that had been captured in Cuban waters. In June 2004, the facility was taken over by Dolphin Discovery, a Mexican-based company that operates a number of swim-with-the-dolphins attractions in the Caribbean and further dolphins were imported from Mexico, reportedly also originating from the wild in Cuba.

When the facility was inspected in September 2004, nine dolphins were found living in deplorable conditions. The enclosure was only eight feet deep at its deepest end. The dolphins had no access to shade from the sun and many had unusually dark skin, as a result of sunburn. The facility had also caused numerous environmental problems to the local area. The natural water flow from an adjacent salt pond was restricted by the facility which intentionally obstructed the drainage when it built the facility. As a result, the pond overflowed when heavy rain set in, affecting businesses and private property in the area with contaminated water. Dolphin Discovery were repeatedly asked to move the dolphins to another location in Antigua, but these requests were ignored.

The facility finally closed later that year, with the animals moved to the Dolphin Discovery facility in Tortola in November 2004. Dolphin Discovery was denied a permit to return to Antigua & Barbuda in April 2005.

Now, another captive dolphin chain, Dolphin Cove, has expressed an interest in developing a facility in Antigua and this has been met with a flurry of opposition, including the development of a petition, calling on the government to implement legislation to ban dolphin captivity in the country. Please support this campaign as WDC is doing, and add your signature of support.