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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Mass whale stranding linked to extreme man-made noise for the first time

A detailed investigation into a highly unusual mass stranding in May-June 2008 in which about 100 melon-headed whales washed up around the Loza Lagoon, northwest Madagascar has concluded that the cause was likely to have been high levels of underwater noise from sonar used by an oil exploration company to map the seabed. 

The report says that noise  from a high-power 12kHz multibeam echosounder system operated by a survey vessel contracted by ExxonMobil Exploration and Production (Northern Madagascar) Limited was determined to be the most likely cause of the mass stranding.

While aspects of this tragic event will remain unknown, the Independent Scientific Review Panel systematically excluded or deemed highly unlikely nearly all potential reasons for the animals leaving their typical offshore habitat and entering the Loza Lagoon. Seismic airguns, used in an offshore seismic survey several days after the whales were already in the lagoon system, were ruled out.

The multibeam echosounder system operated intermittently about 65km offshore by a survey vessel the day before the first known stranding. 

Evidence of the widespread impacts of intense noise pollution continues to be felt by an increasing number of whale and dolphin species throughout the worlds’ oceans. Regulators, and marine users that generate intense noise pollution, need to reassess how we manage and mitigate these disruptive and sometimes fatal sources of pollution. Noise-reducing alternatives to noisy sound sources should be advanced wherever possible”.

The full report can be found here: http://iwc.int/2008-mass-stranding-in-madagascar