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Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

Genting urged to free dolphins!

Saturday 21st September saw the launch of a new campaign by Singapore’s Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES), supported by WDC, to highlight the plight of wild-caught dolphins in the Genting-company owned Resorts World Singapore. Twenty-four Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins, captured in the waters of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific, are being held at Resorts World’s Marine Life Park attraction, which plans to open to the public on 30th September, offering interaction programmes. Twenty-seven dolphins were purchased by Genting between 2008 and 2009 and three have already died. Meanwhile, continued live captures of bottlenose dolphins in Solomon Islands waters have been condemned by scientific experts, CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) and the Solomon Islands government itself.

ACRES held an event outside Genting’s casino in central London on Saturday to launch their campaign, which calls on the company to allow the dolphins held at Resorts World to return home to freedom in the Solomon Islands. They launched an online petition, which we urge you to sign.