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A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

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Common dolphins at surface

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Leaping harbour porpoise

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Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

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Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

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Risso's dolphin at surface

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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

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When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...

Genting urged to free dolphins!

Saturday 21st September saw the launch of a new campaign by Singapore’s Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES), supported by WDC, to highlight the plight of wild-caught dolphins in the Genting-company owned Resorts World Singapore. Twenty-four Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins, captured in the waters of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific, are being held at Resorts World’s Marine Life Park attraction, which plans to open to the public on 30th September, offering interaction programmes. Twenty-seven dolphins were purchased by Genting between 2008 and 2009 and three have already died. Meanwhile, continued live captures of bottlenose dolphins in Solomon Islands waters have been condemned by scientific experts, CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) and the Solomon Islands government itself.

ACRES held an event outside Genting’s casino in central London on Saturday to launch their campaign, which calls on the company to allow the dolphins held at Resorts World to return home to freedom in the Solomon Islands. They launched an online petition, which we urge you to sign.