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Dolphin shot in Australian sanctuary

There have been calls for more rangers to patrol the area around the Adelaide’s Port River dolphin sanctuary following the discovery of a shotgun pellet in a young dolphin found dead in the areas outer harbour.

Three other dolphins have been found dead in the sanctuary in recent weeks and WDC believes that the deaths could be partly due to the lack of rangers and patrols in the region, and that

the sanctuary management should be reviewed following the State government’s recent decision to reduce the number of rangers from three full-time staff to one full-time and one part-time staff member.

WDC volunteer in Australia, Marianna Boorman said the recent death highlighted the dolphins were under threat from attack in the sanctuary. “It does highlight the need for increased staff in the sanctuary and increased protection for the dolphins,”

In South Australia, the maximum penalty for killing or injuring a protected marine mammal is $100,000, or two years in jail.