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Fishers' involvement is crucial. Image: WDC/JTF

When porpoises and people overlap

We're funding a project in Hong Kong that's working with fishing communities to help save...

Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...

WDC launches a new ID guide to the Whales and Dolphins of Iceland

WDC was back in Reykjavik this week to launch the latest in our popular series of international field ID guides – the Whales and Dolphins of Iceland. 

Thanks to our sponsors, Icelandic whale watch operators Elding and Laki Tours, 10,000 bilingual copies will now be distributed throughout Iceland’s booming tourist sector encouraging visitors to see for themselves the incredible wildlife in this unique land. In 2013, for the first time ever, tourism income has outstripped revenue from fisheries –  traditionally Iceland’s largest industry. By 2016 Iceland will welcome one million visitors each year with whale watching being one of the top ‘must do’ activities.

These new guides are a great introduction to Iceland’s marine wildlife whilst also offering visitors the opportunity to make informed decisions during their stay. Choosing a responsible boat operator to enhance your whale watch experience and avoiding any restaurant, hotel or shop that serves whale meat will deliver a strong message to the Icelandic authorities. The vast majority of visitors to this friendly island want to see these majestic creatures as nature intended and not served up on a plate in the name of ‘tradition’.