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Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...
Fin whale

From managing commercial slaughter to saving the whale – the International Whaling Commission at 75

Governments come together under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to make decisions...

Pausing to Reflect on Policy

Over the last three and a half months I have been fortunate enough to be one of the first policy interns at WDC’s North American office. After two years of law-school considering the legal implications of regulations and policy decisions surrounding marine wildlife, it was a new track for me to apply my skills in an entirely non-legal setting. As my last day in the office as a WDC intern begins to wind down, I am left with a moment to pause and look back over where this summer has taken me.

The first thing I notice is that this might be the first time in the last three and half months I’ve actually had the option of stopping to look back on my work this summer. It quickly became apparent to me that even though I spent most of my time in the office, I was kept every bit as busy as my fellow interns who were going out in the field. Although I came into this summer expecting to focus on ship strikes in Sri Lanka, the broad spectrum of issues faced by marine mammals and multiple proposed rules from National Marine Fisheries Service has forced my work to be far more dynamic than originally anticipated. In the last three and half months I have been pulled every which way, being forced to work on vessel strikes, marine entanglements, noise pollution, captivity, drive hunts, whaling, wind farms, and so much more. Before starting this internship my interests focused largely on the impacts of noise pollution in the marine environment. After this summer I am surprised how my knowledge has expaned in just three and ahalf months, turning me into a much more well-rounded advocate.

One of the aspects that has been truly enjoyable for me is to diversify my tool box as a future marine mammal advocate, not only by working in a non-legal setting, but also by working in a team with field interns, all of whom have the potential to do great things in the field of marine mammal science. As has been pointed out to me several times this summer when faced with a problem lawyers tend to look at issues differently than biologists, both of whom look at things differently than advocates and policy makers. Over the course of the summer I have felt greatly blessed to work with individuals, both inside and outside the organization, with such diverse backgrounds, who have allowed me to grow both personally and professionally.

Further comfort is that while this is my last day as a WDC intern, it is not my last day working with the organization (a fact Regina is often quick to remind me of). This fall I will be working under a local attorney, and plan to stay involved with the organization in a variety of capacities. I look forward to continuing my work with WDC, albeit in a different setting and helping them continue their mission of advocating for a world where every whale and dolphin is safe and free.