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Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

Springer has a calf!

In the summer of 2007, I was fortunate enough to travel to British Columbia and the waters north of Vancouver Island where the Northern Resident population of orcas spend their summers. One day, out on the water, I saw Springer or A-73, a young female orca whose story I knew pretty well.

Springer was found alone in 2002 in Puget Sound, many miles from home, after her mother died and she became separated from her pod. From her vocalisations, Helena Symonds at Orcalab, a WDC funded project and home to WDC’s Adopt an Orca programme, was able to identify her family among the Northern Residents. So began a project to rehabilitate her back to good health and return her to her home waters and an orca pod she would be accepted into. The project to save Springer was thankfully successful and her progress has been monitored as her pod returns to the waters around Vancouver Island each year. This year, now aged 13, Springer has been seen with her first calf. We are very excited at this news and wish Springer and her pod every success with their new family member. Another great chapter in the successful return of Springer to her home waters.