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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

Sightings galore for Big Watch Weekend

Shorewatch weekendWith so many amazing places around the Scottish coastline to watch out for whales and dolphins, you’re never too far away from witnessing an incredible wildlife moment, which we all love to see! That’s why on the 7th, 8th and 9th June 2013 we kicked the watching season off with a bang, in the form of the biannual Shorewatch ‘BIG Watch Weekend’; three days of continuous watching, getting as many trained Shorewatchers to do as many watches as possible from all of our sites. It was a record breaking year of sightings, and brought our Shorewatchers together in a fantastic team effort, sharing their sightings and promoting the important work that the WDC Shorewatch programme is carrying out.

Over the course of the weekend, 37 Shorewatchers from 16 sites completed 292 watches (up from 162 in June 2012), resulting in a record breaking 48.7 hours (over two days!!) of continuous watching! There were 51 positive watches recorded with an impressive total of 237 individuals sighted (up from 75 last year); comprising of bottlenose dolphin, harbour porpoise, common dolphin, Risso’s dolphin, minke whale and orca!!

I think it is safe to say that the weekend was a huge success; as well as all the watches carried out, the sun shone, prizes were won (most watches done etc.), and people had a great time being out and about around our beautiful coastline. It was a lovely weekend and a great way to start off the watching season and hopefully a glimpse of what is to come!

We couldn’t have done it without all of our amazingly dedicated Shorewatchers. Thank you for all of your effort! The valuable data that has been collected, recording the presence and absence of whales, dolphins and porpoises, allows us to get a much broader and detailed picture is what is going on around our coastline.