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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...

Dolphin deaths report released by South Australian Govt. Working Group

The Inter-Agency Marine Life Deaths Working Group has released its first report on the recent spate of dolphin and fish deaths in Gulf St. Vincent in South Australia (SA) and associated waters. Of the 34 dolphins found, six had been tested for morbillivirus by the time that the report was released, and the results were positive. This is the first time that this particular virus has been found in SA waters.

Morbillivirus is thought to cause suppression of the immune system that allows other diseases, such as fungus and parasites to thrive. Younger dolphins are particularly susceptible, and comprised the vast majority of the dead dolphins found.

Issues that the report has not been able to address include how did the virus enter SA waters, or if it was already here, and what conditions caused it to suddenly impact on the local population. It is also unknown whether the local population will now acquire immunity to the virus.

Luckily, the virus has yet to impact on Adelaide’s Port River dolphin population, with the only death during the March/ April period being a young calf known as Mimo. Initial examination of Mimo indicated the death to be caused by a physical defect. Mimo has yet to be tested for morbillivirus.

The report is attached.