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Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

Dolphin deaths report released by South Australian Govt. Working Group

The Inter-Agency Marine Life Deaths Working Group has released its first report on the recent spate of dolphin and fish deaths in Gulf St. Vincent in South Australia (SA) and associated waters. Of the 34 dolphins found, six had been tested for morbillivirus by the time that the report was released, and the results were positive. This is the first time that this particular virus has been found in SA waters.

Morbillivirus is thought to cause suppression of the immune system that allows other diseases, such as fungus and parasites to thrive. Younger dolphins are particularly susceptible, and comprised the vast majority of the dead dolphins found.

Issues that the report has not been able to address include how did the virus enter SA waters, or if it was already here, and what conditions caused it to suddenly impact on the local population. It is also unknown whether the local population will now acquire immunity to the virus.

Luckily, the virus has yet to impact on Adelaide’s Port River dolphin population, with the only death during the March/ April period being a young calf known as Mimo. Initial examination of Mimo indicated the death to be caused by a physical defect. Mimo has yet to be tested for morbillivirus.

The report is attached.