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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

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The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

Where will New Zealand and Japan go on the issue of whaling?

I read with interest in the New Zealand Herald that the New Zealand Government have raised the issue of whaling with Japan.

The Herald reports that ‘Foreign Minister Murray McCully has told his Japanese counterpart that he is hopeful Japan will be open to resuming talks with New Zealand to find a diplomatic solution to whaling – despite New Zealand’s decision to take part in Australia’s International Court of Justice case to try to force Japan to stop whaling.’

Whilst we welcome the fact that the NZ Government are stepping up to the plate with Japan we hope that this does not mean a return to the negotiating position NZ adopted in recent years. The NZ Government turned its historical anti-whaling position around and entered into compromise negotiations with Japan within the ‘Future of IWC’ discussions, and indeed, was at one stage seen to be leading the charge for compromise alongside the USA.

We have to hope that the lessons of that time have been learned and this time NZ can represent the overwhelming view of the NZ people who don’t want to see legal commercial whaling come back – ever.

You can find out more about whaling