Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...

A life-line for the smallest dolphin of them all?

Throughout its limited range of only a 48km radius in the northern end of the Gulf of California, the vaquita has been rapidly declining in numbers due to incidental entanglement in drift nets and less than 200 are thought to survive. Not only the smallest but possibly the most critically endangered cetacean of them all, the vaquita may finally have a chance at survival. 

After several efforts to protect these little porpoises, for example the creation of a Biosphere Reserve in 1993 to protect the vaquita and their habitat, WWF reports that the Government of Mexico has taken a decisive step towards ensuring their future conservation at the same time as promoting sustainable fisheries by approving a new regulation, called an “official norm”.  As a result of this measure, over the course of the next 3 years, drift gillnets (the type of gear responsible for vaquita deaths) will be substituted for selective fishing gear that do not kill the world’s smallest porpoise yet still ensure a livelihood for local fishermen. 

This long awaited regulation will go some way to establishing shrimping standards within Mexico, determining the various fishing gears permitted in different zones in the country and ultimately protecting the smallest dolphin of them all.

Find out more information on the vaquita and the work that WDC has been supporting.