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A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

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Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...

Inaugural Race to Save a Species- an Overwhelming Success!

Written by Emily Moss, WDC Campaign Officer:

We thought we were pushing our luck hoping for 60 participants and everyone in our office reached out to people and organizations they knew in an effort to meet that goal. On Saturday morning, I was in disbelief when we had 126 runners lined up to start the first Race to Save a Species 5k.

Here in Massachusetts, the right whale is the state’s designated marine mammal. This is because of its long history in these waters and, because now that there are fewer than 500 remaining, we are so very lucky to still have them in the bay during their seasonal migration. Most people will never get the chance to see a North Atlantic right whale, let alone watch them from their backyards. So it was truly heartening to stand in front of the surprisingly large crowd on Saturday and thank everyone for being there and supporting WDC in their efforts to protect this critically endangered species.

While this was our first race, our organization has had an office in Plymouth MA for 8 years. However most of our work keeps us in the office or out on the water and very few residents of Massachusetts know who we are or what we do. More importantly, there have been North Atlantic right whales travelling through Cape Cod Bay for as long as people have been here to observe them and too many people have no idea that they are here and that their species is in peril. The ACT RIGHT NOW campaign was launched last December to change that; to rally support to make sure this species can survive. The Race to Save a Species was a part of this campaign meant to bring Massachusetts citizens together in support of these efforts and to let people know that WDC is here and doing important work that everyone can be a part of.  Because of the overwhelming success of this year’s Race to Save a Species, we have already set the date for next year’s race- Saturday, May 3rd!

To learn more about what you can do, please visit whales.org, contact us at (508) 746-2522 or [email protected]