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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Two more amazing stories have emerged which serve as a reminder of just how intelligent whales and dolphins are. According to information from dolphin researchers in South Korea published in Marine Mammal Science, a pod of 12 wild long-beaked common dolphins have been documented working together to create a ‘life raft’ to help keep a dying dolphin afloat the East Sea, South Korea.

It is thought to be the first documented instance of dolphins working together as a team to try and save one of their own, and demonstrates how smart and caring dolphins can be. The sick dolphin eventually died but the group also appeared to try and resuscitate the sick dolphin by biting and trying to stimulate it.

Meanwhile, in Australia, news reports state that a woman has been helped to safety by a pod of dolphins after she fell into the sea whilst trying to rescue her dog.

Karyn Gitsham was walking along the beach at Carrickalinga, on South Australia’s Fleurieu Peninsula, when one of her two dogs got into trouble after chasing seagulls into the water.

Ms Gitsham followed the dog from a nearby cliff but fell into the sea herself shortly afterwards.

“I remember going under and coming back up I saw a fin, and I saw him, and thought ‘oh great, it’s a shark’,” she said.

“And then I saw another fin then I realised they were dolphins.

“These dolphins just formed this horseshoe and were guiding him in, pushing him in.”

Ms Gitsham says the dolphins then nudged them both to safety.