Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching

Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

The world’s rarest species of whale has been seen and photographed.  

140 years after it was first identified from a jaw bone, two spade-toothed beaked whales were found stranded on a beach in New Zealand in December 2010. But, the whales, which can grow to more than 5 metres (16 feet) long, were initially mistaken for Gray’s beaked whales and buried.

DNA samples were taken from the mother and calf which later revealed their true identity and the remains were dug up. It is thought to be the first time this species has ever been seen as a complete specimen.

Little is known about this species and it is not clear why the whales swam on to the beach.