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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
Amazon River dolphin (Boto)

River dolphins observed playing with anaconda

Researchers in Bolivia recorded an unusual interaction between local rivers dolphins and an anaconda snake...

Scientists in the UK have published a study that may reveal the reasons why females orcas can live for a further 50 years after having their offspring.

According to experts from the University of Exeter, the presence of mothers ensured greater survival of adult sons to an age when they can breed, and so might explain possible reasons for this long but non-reproductive phase of their lives.

Orcas have one of the longest post-reproductive life spans in the natural world and the young never leave their mothers, remaining in a single group or pod.

The research showed that, for a male over 30, the death of his mother means an almost 14-fold-increase in the likelihood of his death within the following year.

More on orcas