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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

WDCS Condemns Use Of Dolphins As A Military Resource

A retired US Admiral has gone on record recently confirming that the US Navy has trained dolphins to detect mines and that they’re ready and willing to use them in the Strait of Hormuz, a strategically important sea passage out of the Persian Gulf. Iran has threatened to block the route as a protest against sanctions introduced in response to its nuclear policies.

As many as 80 dolphins have been trained this way if previous reports and the comment from Admiral Tim Keating are to be believed. Some reports say the dolphins are trained to drop transponders near the mines in readiness for naval disposal teams; others say the dolphins would trigger mines and die in the explosion. Whatever the method, dolphins – enlisted or free – would become a prime target for Iranian forces.

Writing in the Guardian, Peter Singer, professor of bioethics at Princeton University, accuses the US Navy of ‘speciesism’:

“Animals, or at least those who are conscious and capable of suffering or enjoying their lives, are not things for us to use in whatever way we find convenient. To believe that, because they are members of a different species, we can ignore or discount their interests is speciesism, a form of prejudice against beings who are not ‘us’ that is akin to racism and sexism.”

WDCS agrees with Professor Singer and is a signatory of the Declaration of Rights for Cetaceans