Pollution

Scientist films plankton ingesting plastic waste

A scientist has recorded a species of plankton consuming plastic microfibre, showing how the lives of even the smallest creatures in the oceans are being impacted by human waste.

Plankton are a prey of several species of large baleen whales as well as many other creatures. While the impact of larger pieces of plastic on wildlife are more obvious to see, this was the first time Dr Richard Kirby had recorded on film this type of waste being consumed by plankton.

One young mans fight against plastic pollution

Ryan is an amazing young man. With hundreds of millions of items of plastic entering circulation every year, and over 80% of it reportedly never recycled, it’s no wonder we have a major plastic pollution issue on our hands. Ryan decided to do something about this from the age of just three. Now aged seven, Ryan has sorted recyclables that have been donated by friends, family, neighbours each week and makes regular trips to the local recycling center in Orange County, California. So far, he has recycled over 200,000 bottles and cans and donated lots of money to charity.

Men in suits - The Life of Riley, A WDC Shorewatch dog

Like most of the Moray Firth in Scotland, the WDC Shorewatch site at Nairn is stunning. We were enjoying the views over the sandy beach and across 5 miles of sea to the entrance of the Cromarty Firth, hoping to catch a glimpse of the world famous Moray Firth dolphins, or maybe a whale, when 'Baldie man' appeared.

WDC joins protest against ship-to-ship oil transfers in Scotland

Hundreds of protesters gathered over the weekend in Nairn to campaign against new plans for ship-to-ship oil transfers in the Moray Firth.

Groups from both sides of the Firth, including WDC, met at Nairn central beach to voice their opposition to Cromarty Firth Port Authority’s request for a licence to begin the transfer millions of tonnes of crude oil at sea.

WDC believes that these oil transfers would pose serious risk to wildlife in the area, and the resident population of bottlenose dolphins in particular.

US Navy sonar illegal rules court

A Court of Appeal in California, has ruled regulations allowing the US Navy to use a low-frequency sonar for training violate the US Marine Mammal Protection Act.

The US Navy currently uses this particular type of sonar in more than half of the world’s ocean, which potentially harms whales, dolphins, and other marine mammals like seals and walruses.

Gulf oil spill caused increase in dolphin calf deaths

Scientists believe that the increased number of stranded stillborn and juvenile dolphins found in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010 to 2013 was likely caused by chronic illnesses in mothers who were exposed to oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon spill, according to a new report which looked at dolphins found along the shorelines of Alabama, Louisiana and Missisippi.

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