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Scientists record first case of infanticide in orcas

For the first time, scientists have recorded an incident in which a male orca deliberately drowned an orca calf from another pod, assisted by his own mother. The mother of the calf tried unsuccessfully to defend her offspring. 

While this behaviour has been recorded in other animals and three species of dolphin, it had never been seen before in orcas.

Over 130 whales die on Australian beach

Over 130 short-finned pilot whales have died in a mass stranding on a beach in Western Australia.

Commercial fishermen spotted the pod of 150 whales stranding at Hamelin Bay, 200 miles south of Perth. Western Australia state’s Parks and Wildlife Service arrived at the scene by morning and were assessing the health of around 15 whales left alive, attempting to herd some of the whales back out to sea.

WDC partners with Teemill to launch our new online clothing store

We are excited to announce that WDC has been working with UK-based sustainable clothing manufacturer, Teemill, to design a new clothing and accessories range that supports WDC’s conservation work and campaigns around the world.

The range features 10 new designs available on 100% organic cotton t-shirts, hoodies, sweatshirts and tote bags – made in a factory that runs on 100% renewable energy. The new designs highlight some of the key areas of WDC’s work to keep whales and dolphins safe and free, including ending captivity and the fight to rid the seas of dangerous plastic waste.

New study suggests amount of microplastic in oceans could be much higher

A new global map of aquatic plastic pollution has revealed that rivers in the north west of the UK have the highest microplastic pollution discovered so far anywhere in the world.

Scientists from the University of Manchester took samples from 40 sites across the region with over 500,000 microplastic particles discovered in the River Tame alone.

Endangered porpoise could be even closer to extinction than first thought

Unconfirmed reports on the plight of the vaquita suggest that no more than 12 now remain.

Vaquitas are the world’s smallest and one of the most endangered species of whale, dolphin or porpoise on the planet. Found only in Mexico’s northern Gulf of California, the population has declined by more than 75% in the past three years alone. In Spanish, vaquita means 'little cow' and many local people believe them to be 'mythical creatures' as most have never seen one and photographs, until recently, were lacking.

Norway increases whaling quota despite declining demand

Norway's government has announced an increase in the number of minke whales that can be hunted this year from 999 to 1278.

This is 28% more than in 2017 even though recent years have seen a decline in the number of whales being killed and fewer whaling vessels heading out to sea.

Falling consumer demand and higher fuel prices along with apparent increasing difficulty in finding the whales have all been blamed on the industry's decline.

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